Tanka T027

I went electric –
Fifty years post Bob Dylan’s
Manchester moment –
Where someone called him Judas
For having gone electric

05.17.16

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Copyright by Minh Tan on listed dated of completion.

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Notes to this poem…

I’ve played guitar for over a decade now, but have only rarely dabbled with electric guitars. Too heavy. Too cumbersome with amp. Too impractical with electrical needs. However, much easier on the left hand fingers!

The ability to get in more practice with fewer and gentler callouses on my left hand fingers, leaving me uncomfortable less of the time, was what ultimately convinced me to bring an electric guitar into my life. I made the commitment earlier this year. However, something inside my head prompted me to check on the date one of my favourite moments in music history, and one of the turning points in 20th century music, to see if it would be practical to go electric on that anniversary. I’m talking about the anniversary of the Bob Dylan concert in the Manchester Free Trade Hall on May 17th, 1966. Someone called him Judas for going electric from the folk scene he was at the core of, and he responded with a command to his band to “play it f*cking loud!” going into Like a Rolling Stone.

Well, it turned out this year was the 50th anniversary, and the moment was in May, which wasn’t too long for me to wait.

With today being May 17th and that 50th anniversary, I brought out the electric guitar and played it f*cking loud!

I played through my repertoire of personally arranged and tabbed Bob Dylan songs, some of which are on my blog. And I also played a few of my own songs electric, also in that link.

And all I’ve got say is now I know why Bob went electric. 😉

The historic moment described in a great BBC article.

My humble beginner electric guitar set up, but it’s electric!

The poems titled Tanka, followed by a number, are tanka composed while I was not engaged in some activity during which I frequently composed poetry. That is why these are called the Inactive Tanka collection.

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